Category Archives: News

Any and all DNI-related news. Any post that is NOT intended for use on the front page should be assigned to this category or it will not show up in the post list.

Can Black Panther’s Vibranium Ever Be Real?

DNI faculty, Prof. Yury Gogotsi, is featured on website GIZMODO discussing the fictional material Vibranium, as featured in the recent popular Marvel Black Panther Movie.

Prof. Gogotsi states: “We can say that with a high probability no natural material can have those properties. As we know that all the same elements exist in the universe as on our planet earth, no mineral of pure metal is expected to have properties of Vibranium. Some of the properties of vibranium can be achieved, though not at the same scale, by design of material structure and architecture using advanced nanomaterials. Piezoelectric materials transform mechanical pressure and vibrations into voltage. Charge produced by piezoelectric materials can be stored and used. Kids running around in sneakers that lighten up with every step demonstrate this principle. Light advanced ceramic materials, such as boron carbide and silicon carbide, are used as armor in bullet-proof vests. They protect due to their extreme hardness—they are harder than any metal.

Material architectures capable of absorbing blast energy are being developed and can, potentially, protect a person jumping from a high altitude (but, again, this will be a 20-feet rather than a 20-story jump).”

Read the full article here.

Joint Publication with NNFC-KAIST

Our work with KAIST on MXene sensors (S. J. Kim, H.-J. Koh, C. E. Ren, O. Kwon, K. Maleski, S.-Y. Cho, B. Anasori, C.-K. Kim, Y.-K. Choi, J. Kim, Y. Gogotsi, H.-T. Jung, Metallic Ti3C2Tx MXene gas sensors with ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio, ACS Nano, 2018) got nice coverage in C&EN:
Congratulations to Kathleen, Babak and our KAIST-NNFC collaborators!

ACS Editors’ Choice Article on MXene Gas Sensors

Researchers from the DNI have just published a high-impact article on MXene gas sensors produced with our KAIST collaborators:
S. J. Kim, H.-J. Koh, C. E. Ren, O. Kwon, K. Maleski, S.-Y. Cho, B. Anasori, C.-K. Kim, Y.-K. Choi, J. Kim, Y. Gogotsi, H.-T. Jung, Metallic Ti3C2Tx MXene gas sensors with ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio, ACS Nano, (2018)
It has been selected by ACS as ACS Editors’ Choice article and published Open Access ($3000 fee waived). ACS selects a  paper per day (less than 1% of all papers published) from more than 50 ACS journals as “Editors’ Choice”, so it’s an important recognition that adds visibility to our paper.
We demonstrate that a metallic 2D MXene gas-sensing channel with high conductivity greatly outperforms conventional sensing materials in two critical aspects. First, a Ti3C2Tx gas sensor exhibits a limit of detection of 50~100 parts per billion (ppb) for volatile organic compounds, which is one of the lowest limits of their detection at room temperature ever reported. Second, the extremely low noise of metallic Ti3C2Tx leads to the signal-to-noise ratio two orders of magnitude higher than that of the published sensors. This study introduces a paradigm shift from semiconducting to metallic sensing channels for developing highly sensitive sensors.
The first author, Seon Joon (Steven) Kim, is a former visiting student who spent 6 months at Drexel during his PhD study. We expect him to come back to Drexel as a visiting post-doctoral scientist supported by our NNFC-KAIST-Drexel Nano Co-op Center soon.
Congratulations to Steven, Kathleen, Evelyn, Babak and other co-authors!
Read the full press release here.

New Energy Storage Technologies for Enabling Renewables at CHF

Prof. Yury Gogotsi and Prof. M. Stanley Whittingham, professor of chemistry and materials science and engineering, SUNY Binghamton presented “New Energy Storage Technologies for Enabling Renewables” at the Chemical Heritage Foundation. 
Many systems and devices we use every day, including our cell phones and laptops, require batteries. Electric cars, solar and wind farms, and off-grid homes need much larger batteries. And we expect smart clothes and the internet to change how we live and how we gather and consume information in the near future. They will all need to be powered, but by much smaller, more flexible, and longer-lasting energy storage devices. The speakers presented on the discovery of the lithium battery and the long journey from the Sony camcorder battery to the modern lithium-ion battery. They also explained what is coming after lithium-ion batteries. In particular, “batteries on steroids,” or electrochemical capacitors, that now power buses in many Chinese cities, open the doors of an Airbus 380 in an emergency, and harvest braking energy from SEPTA trains, will be discussed. Finally, future flexible, transparent, microscale, wearable, and other energy storage devices that are expected to become ubiquitous within the next decade will be discussed. View pictures from the event below.

DNI 2018 Calendar

The A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute wishes all of our students, alumni, collaborators, and peers a very happy holiday and all the best for 2018.

Please check out our 2018 calendar here.

Drexel REU on Energy and the Environment

Our 2018 REU Program is now OPEN for applications!
 
Drexel REU on Energy and the Environment
June 18 – August 10, 2018
Learn more about the program here.

2017 Energy Storage Materials Award

Congratulations to Prof. Yury Gogotsi for being awarded the 2017 Energy Storage Materials Award (Elsevier) in recognition of his outstanding achievements in the field of energy storage materials and development.

Forbes 30 Under 30 in Science

Congratulations to BS alumna Pri Narang (currently, Asst. Prof. at Harvard) on a major national recognition. She has been selected by Forbes Among 30 Under 30 in science for her work on quantum-engineered materials.

https://www.forbes.com/pictures/59f77f3c31358e542c047796/prineha-narang-28/#2001f60e3408

Nanodiamonds Found to Prevent Lithium Battery Fires

Our work on nanodiamond additive suppressing lithium dendrites keeps attracting attention of news media. This article titled “Nanodiamonds Found to Prevent Lithium Battery Fires” was published in EE Times this week.

2017 Energy Storage Materials Award

Professor Yury Gogotsi has won the 2017 Energy Storage Materials Award, which is awarded by the journal Energy Storage Materials. The Award will be presented to Professor Gogotsi at the ICEnSM 2017 (2017 International Conference on Energy Storage Materials), which will be held in Shenzhen, China, on Nov. 18-21, 2017. The award, which is sponsored by Elsevier, gives special recognition to a person who has accomplished outstanding achievements in energy storage materials and devices.

Read the full story here.