Category Archives: News

Any and all DNI-related news. Any post that is NOT intended for use on the front page should be assigned to this category or it will not show up in the post list.

New Paper in Nature

Congratulations to Ph.D. Candidate, Tyler Mathis, Dr. Babak Anasori and our former team member Dr. Mengqiang Zhao on publishing a nice paper in Nature. This work results from collaboration with Prof. Shu Yang’s group at UPenn.
Y. Xia, T. Mathis, M.-Q. Zhao, B. Anasori, A. Dang, Z. Zhou, H. Cho, Y. Gogotsi, S. Yang,Thickness Independent Capacitance of Vertically Aligned Liquid Crystalline MXenes, Nature, 557, 409–412(2018)
Here is a link to a view-only version of our paper: https://rdcu.be/OqOM

Prof. Gogotsi Receives an Honorary Doctorate from KPI

On May 14th, 2018, Prof. Yury Gogotsi received an honorary doctorate from the National Technical University of Ukraine “Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute (NTUU “KPI”), Kiev, Ukraine.

A youtube video of the ceremony is available here.

 

Undergraduate Research Co-Ops Travel to Korea

The A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials is proud to send the first cohort of 4 undergraduate researchers to South Korea for a 5-month research co-op. The students will be working with colleagues at NNFC-KAIST and KIST on individual research projects led by Drexel faculty.  This collaboration is part of the NNFC-Drexel Nano2 Co-op Center, funded by the NRF and supported by Drexel’s Steinbright Career Development Center (SCDC), Office of International Programs, College of Engineering, and the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute.

 

WHAT MAKES JOEL EMBIID’S MASK SO INDESTRUCTIBLE?

Read the latest interview from PhD student, Ariana Levitt, on the polymer materials used in Philadelphia 76ers player, Joel Embiid’s protective mask.

Read the full story here.

Collaboration with KAIST Featured in Chemical Engineering Magazine

DNI research done in collaboration with KAIST and published as a cover article in ACS Nano (https://pubs.acs.org/toc/ancac3/12/2) received nice coverage in Chemical Engineering magazine:
Four Drexel undergraduate co-ops will be participating in this and other research during their 6 month research co-op in Korea starting in May 2018,

Gordon Research Conference on Batteries

Drexel was represented by several current faculty members (Katya Pomerantseva, MSE, Maureen Tang, CBE, Yury Gogotsi, MSE) and alums – Prof. Gleb Yushin (Georgia Tech), Dr. Kevin Knehr (Princeton) and Prof. Kelsey Hatzell (Vanderbilt) at the Gordon Research Conference on Batteries.  Drexel faculty, students, and alumni continue making significant impact in the energy field.

 

PA Junior Academy of Science Awardees Science Fair

Three of our visiting high school students have won 1st place prizes at the PA Junior Academy of Science.  They will proceed to the State competition next in State College, PA.  The students are advised by current PhD students, Kanit Hantanasirisakul and Kathleen Maleski.

Congratulations to all!

 

Can Black Panther’s Vibranium Ever Be Real?

DNI faculty, Prof. Yury Gogotsi, is featured on website GIZMODO discussing the fictional material Vibranium, as featured in the recent popular Marvel Black Panther Movie.

Prof. Gogotsi states: “We can say that with a high probability no natural material can have those properties. As we know that all the same elements exist in the universe as on our planet earth, no mineral of pure metal is expected to have properties of Vibranium. Some of the properties of vibranium can be achieved, though not at the same scale, by design of material structure and architecture using advanced nanomaterials. Piezoelectric materials transform mechanical pressure and vibrations into voltage. Charge produced by piezoelectric materials can be stored and used. Kids running around in sneakers that lighten up with every step demonstrate this principle. Light advanced ceramic materials, such as boron carbide and silicon carbide, are used as armor in bullet-proof vests. They protect due to their extreme hardness—they are harder than any metal.

Material architectures capable of absorbing blast energy are being developed and can, potentially, protect a person jumping from a high altitude (but, again, this will be a 20-feet rather than a 20-story jump).”

Read the full article here.

Joint Publication with NNFC-KAIST

Our work with KAIST on MXene sensors (S. J. Kim, H.-J. Koh, C. E. Ren, O. Kwon, K. Maleski, S.-Y. Cho, B. Anasori, C.-K. Kim, Y.-K. Choi, J. Kim, Y. Gogotsi, H.-T. Jung, Metallic Ti3C2Tx MXene gas sensors with ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio, ACS Nano, 2018) got nice coverage in C&EN:
Congratulations to Kathleen, Babak and our KAIST-NNFC collaborators!

ACS Editors’ Choice Article on MXene Gas Sensors

Researchers from the DNI have just published a high-impact article on MXene gas sensors produced with our KAIST collaborators:
S. J. Kim, H.-J. Koh, C. E. Ren, O. Kwon, K. Maleski, S.-Y. Cho, B. Anasori, C.-K. Kim, Y.-K. Choi, J. Kim, Y. Gogotsi, H.-T. Jung, Metallic Ti3C2Tx MXene gas sensors with ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio, ACS Nano, (2018)
It has been selected by ACS as ACS Editors’ Choice article and published Open Access ($3000 fee waived). ACS selects a  paper per day (less than 1% of all papers published) from more than 50 ACS journals as “Editors’ Choice”, so it’s an important recognition that adds visibility to our paper.
We demonstrate that a metallic 2D MXene gas-sensing channel with high conductivity greatly outperforms conventional sensing materials in two critical aspects. First, a Ti3C2Tx gas sensor exhibits a limit of detection of 50~100 parts per billion (ppb) for volatile organic compounds, which is one of the lowest limits of their detection at room temperature ever reported. Second, the extremely low noise of metallic Ti3C2Tx leads to the signal-to-noise ratio two orders of magnitude higher than that of the published sensors. This study introduces a paradigm shift from semiconducting to metallic sensing channels for developing highly sensitive sensors.
The first author, Seon Joon (Steven) Kim, is a former visiting student who spent 6 months at Drexel during his PhD study. We expect him to come back to Drexel as a visiting post-doctoral scientist supported by our NNFC-KAIST-Drexel Nano Co-op Center soon.
Congratulations to Steven, Kathleen, Evelyn, Babak and other co-authors!
Read the full press release here.