Category Archives: Main-Featured

MES S680: Biotechnology and Industry in China

The high-technology industry in China is in the news a lot these days, but do you ever wonder what it’s really like? Find out this September 2018 by taking the special topics course BMES S680: Biotechnology and Industry in China, a one-week, 3-credit ‘intensive course abroad’ in Shanghai that will run during fall break, Sept. 14-22, 2018 (syllabus attached). Taught by DNI affiliated professor, Dr. Kara Spiller (Drexel BIOMED), who lived in Shanghai for a year and who speaks enough Mandarian Chinese that she won’t get you lost during daily activities, features visits to start-up biotechnology companies, large biotech companies like GSK and Amgen, and translational research laboratories in and outside of Shanghai, as well as social activities with ample opportunity to interact with Chinese students studying biomedical sciences and entrepeneurship at Shanghai Jiao Tong University and ShanghaiTech University.

More information, including a tentative itinerary and course fees, can be found here: http://studyabroad.drexel.edu/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=47801

This course is open to graduate students and rising seniors of all programs, especially those with backgrounds in biomedical sciences and/or business. Applications are due May 1.

Collaboration with KAIST Featured in Chemical Engineering Magazine

DNI research done in collaboration with KAIST and published as a cover article in ACS Nano (https://pubs.acs.org/toc/ancac3/12/2) received nice coverage in Chemical Engineering magazine:
Four Drexel undergraduate co-ops will be participating in this and other research during their 6 month research co-op in Korea starting in May 2018,

2018 Drexel Emerging Graduate Scholars Conference

The Graduate College, Graduate Student Association (GSA), and Office of Research are pleased to announce the Drexel Emerging Graduate Scholars Conference, a University-wide conference focused on innovative and interdisciplinary graduate research, on April 19, 2018.

This full-day conference provides opportunities for graduate students to showcase their research, participate in in-demand professional development workshops, and network with colleagues and professionals across diverse fields. The Emerging Graduate Scholars Conference also offers the University community with the opportunity to learn more about the innovative and problem-solving research of Drexel’s brightest and most promising graduate students.

Date: Thursday, April 19, 2018
Time: 8:00am – 6:00 pm
Location: Bossone Research Center

Please see this page for additional information.

DREXEL HONORS FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENT AUTHORS AND EDITORS

On February 26, 2018, the Drexel University Libraries and the Office of the Provost hosted the sixth annual Celebrating Drexel Authors Event. This year, the event honored a total of 77 Drexel authors with publications in 2017. All 5 individuals honored from the College of Engineering who were recognized for publishing Highly Cited (Web of Science) papers in 2017 were from our MSE department.  Read the full story here.

Congratulations to all of the authors!

 

Gordon Research Conference on Batteries

Drexel was represented by several current faculty members (Katya Pomerantseva, MSE, Maureen Tang, CBE, Yury Gogotsi, MSE) and alums – Prof. Gleb Yushin (Georgia Tech), Dr. Kevin Knehr (Princeton) and Prof. Kelsey Hatzell (Vanderbilt) at the Gordon Research Conference on Batteries.  Drexel faculty, students, and alumni continue making significant impact in the energy field.

 

PA Junior Academy of Science Awardees Science Fair

Three of our visiting high school students have won 1st place prizes at the PA Junior Academy of Science.  They will proceed to the State competition next in State College, PA.  The students are advised by current PhD students, Kanit Hantanasirisakul and Kathleen Maleski.

Congratulations to all!

 

Can Black Panther’s Vibranium Ever Be Real?

DNI faculty, Prof. Yury Gogotsi, is featured on website GIZMODO discussing the fictional material Vibranium, as featured in the recent popular Marvel Black Panther Movie.

Prof. Gogotsi states: “We can say that with a high probability no natural material can have those properties. As we know that all the same elements exist in the universe as on our planet earth, no mineral of pure metal is expected to have properties of Vibranium. Some of the properties of vibranium can be achieved, though not at the same scale, by design of material structure and architecture using advanced nanomaterials. Piezoelectric materials transform mechanical pressure and vibrations into voltage. Charge produced by piezoelectric materials can be stored and used. Kids running around in sneakers that lighten up with every step demonstrate this principle. Light advanced ceramic materials, such as boron carbide and silicon carbide, are used as armor in bullet-proof vests. They protect due to their extreme hardness—they are harder than any metal.

Material architectures capable of absorbing blast energy are being developed and can, potentially, protect a person jumping from a high altitude (but, again, this will be a 20-feet rather than a 20-story jump).”

Read the full article here.

Drexel COE Dean’s Highlights

Check out the Drexel College of Engineering Dean’s Highlights for a summary of the exciting research and advancements coming from Drexel.  DNI work on MXenes is featured in the innovation section of the booklet.

Joint Publication with NNFC-KAIST

Our work with KAIST on MXene sensors (S. J. Kim, H.-J. Koh, C. E. Ren, O. Kwon, K. Maleski, S.-Y. Cho, B. Anasori, C.-K. Kim, Y.-K. Choi, J. Kim, Y. Gogotsi, H.-T. Jung, Metallic Ti3C2Tx MXene gas sensors with ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio, ACS Nano, 2018) got nice coverage in C&EN:
Congratulations to Kathleen, Babak and our KAIST-NNFC collaborators!

ACS Editors’ Choice Article on MXene Gas Sensors

Researchers from the DNI have just published a high-impact article on MXene gas sensors produced with our KAIST collaborators:
S. J. Kim, H.-J. Koh, C. E. Ren, O. Kwon, K. Maleski, S.-Y. Cho, B. Anasori, C.-K. Kim, Y.-K. Choi, J. Kim, Y. Gogotsi, H.-T. Jung, Metallic Ti3C2Tx MXene gas sensors with ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio, ACS Nano, (2018)
It has been selected by ACS as ACS Editors’ Choice article and published Open Access ($3000 fee waived). ACS selects a  paper per day (less than 1% of all papers published) from more than 50 ACS journals as “Editors’ Choice”, so it’s an important recognition that adds visibility to our paper.
We demonstrate that a metallic 2D MXene gas-sensing channel with high conductivity greatly outperforms conventional sensing materials in two critical aspects. First, a Ti3C2Tx gas sensor exhibits a limit of detection of 50~100 parts per billion (ppb) for volatile organic compounds, which is one of the lowest limits of their detection at room temperature ever reported. Second, the extremely low noise of metallic Ti3C2Tx leads to the signal-to-noise ratio two orders of magnitude higher than that of the published sensors. This study introduces a paradigm shift from semiconducting to metallic sensing channels for developing highly sensitive sensors.
The first author, Seon Joon (Steven) Kim, is a former visiting student who spent 6 months at Drexel during his PhD study. We expect him to come back to Drexel as a visiting post-doctoral scientist supported by our NNFC-KAIST-Drexel Nano Co-op Center soon.
Congratulations to Steven, Kathleen, Evelyn, Babak and other co-authors!
Read the full press release here.